Stop Showing Them What They Don’t Want to See

Exasperated manby Tom Baer

Bob Garfield, long-time marketing and media reporter for Advertising Age magazine recently wrote an article about the commonly mistaken mindset many marketers have about using social media.  His article was really geared toward consumer marketers, but the idea behind it is extremely relevant for those of us who market meetings and events as well, so it seems well worth noting here.

The key message is clearly stated in his headline, “Social Media is About Cultivating Community, not Corralling Cattle.”  He feels, and I agree that while most marketers these days are smart enough to realize they need to include social media in their marketing mix, they still view it the same as any other media they use to help drive sales to the bottom line.

While the ultimate goal of any marketing is to drive sales, social media MUST be looked upon and handled differently if it is to help with that bottom line goal.  Too many marketers fall into the trap of approaching social media with the “advertiser” mindset – talk enough about my features, benefits, and brand to get the target to buy.  So their social media efforts are full of features, benefits and brand.  What happens?  Their target gets quickly turned off and wants nothing to do with them anymore.

The goal of your social media effort needs to be building a community, not selling a product, service, or meeting.  They already know you and are interested in you or they would not be following you.  Provide content that is valuable, engaging and interesting to them.  Content they want to share with others – that’s how you build community.  Content like relevant news, polls, contests, pictures and videos.

Then you won’t have to use your social media to sell, because your followers will do it for you.

Advertisements

Time to Get Email Smart

By Tom Baer

Computer with hand sticking outMost associations who market their annual meetings use email as the primary method of reaching out to potential attendees. This is logical, since email is generally much more affordable than other media, and offers a higher ROI than most. But if you are one of these associations, it’s time to ask yourself if that ROI is as good as it could be.
A recent article by Chad White, Research Director at email marketing solutions provider Responsys, suggests email marketers can be divided into two groups: the “Haves” and the “Have-Nots.” What do the “Haves” have? The knowledge, experience, and marketing sense to use the many tools that are available to email marketers to refine their efforts. The “Have-Nots” ignore these helpful tools and send out basic broadcast emails.
White finds that the gap in effectiveness of the two types of emailers is quickly widening. And the annual Email Marketing Industry Census put out by Econsultancy agrees, showing that marketers who use more sophisticated email programs are 32% more likely to see “excellent” or “good” results for their efforts than those who send out broadcast messages.
What are these magic “tools” that can boost your email effectiveness? Techniques like segmentation, personalization, dynamic content, and trigger-based emails. Smart marketers also test subject lines, body copy, images and other elements to learn what their target will respond to best.
Associations often fall into the trap of assuming that emails they send will be effective simply because their email list consists of members who have typically opted-in for communications. But opt-ins still have spam filters, and even if your email gets to their inbox, they are BUSY, so the subject line and the email itself both need to be truly compelling to make sure your message gets through.
Think about how many emails you get each day. How many do you trash without even opening? It’s a safe bet that the marketing-based ones that you read have used some more sophisticated tools to make it past your screen. It’s time your emails did the same.